Preparation Makes Perfect

Take These Steps to Assess a Healthcare Organization’s Readiness for
Marketing Initiatives

Recently, the SPRYTE team participated in the New England Society for Healthcare Communications’ (NESHCo) monthly webinar, “Do You Deserve to be Marketed?,” which focused on the importance of assessing an organization’s readiness for marketing initiatives.

During the webinar, Helayne Lightstone – senior director of marketing and branding for Hartford HealthCare in Connecticut – outlined the following steps healthcare communicators must take before executing a campaign to ensure its success.

Step 1: Assessment

The first step in a “marketing readiness plan” is assessing the key aspects of your campaign. To build the foundation for a successful campaign, answer the following questions:

  • What are your benchmark metrics?
  • Are you looking to bring in more patients and/or build awareness about your organization?
  • What are the differentiators of the product/service/initiative you’re promoting?
  • Is your organization ready to handle the impact of a successful campaign? Do you have a plan for accommodating more patients or a crossover referral strategy?
  • Have you conducted market research for this campaign?
  • What is the competition in your market? Have your competitors implemented similar campaigns?

Step 2: Analysis

After answering all of the questions to identify those key aspects in Step 1, you then must take a deeper dive to analyze two important points of the campaign:

  • Value: Is there a high demand for the service/product/initiative you’re promoting, or is the market oversaturated? How differentiated is your offering, and is it a money maker?
  • Readiness: Are the physicians and staff members involved equipped with the right messaging and training for this campaign? Do you have set patient referral and response tracking plans?

    Are all of the physical and digital collateral, including the website, logos, signage, etc. up-to-date and aligned with the campaign’s messaging?

Step 3: Advance and Apply

Once you’ve developed a clear understanding of your goals, readiness and timing, you can now work together with your team to flesh out the campaign. Be sure to establish a set approval pathway that involves all necessary team members, which may include marketing, creative, clinical, legal, financial and executive personnel. Be sure to engage all members of the team to make sure the process runs as smoothly as possible.

Is Your Organization Ready?

Even the most engaging campaign won’t make an impact if it reaches the wrong audience at the wrong time. By taking these steps, you’ll lay the groundwork to ensure your campaign resonates with the right patients.

Note: Hartford HealthCare Medical Group is one of the largest practices in Connecticut with over 50 locations and over 450 physicians and advanced practitioners.

I See You: Putting the Patient in the Center of the Healthcare Team

What Avatar Teaches Us About Using an Empathetic Approach to Treating Patients

In our blog post for this week, guest blogger Rebecca Bryan, DNP, adult nurse practitioner and Owner of Rebecca Bryan Consulting LLC, discusses the importance of understanding health concerns from the patient’s perspective.

My favorite moment in the movie Avatar is the love scene between protagonist Jake and Neytiri, a female Na’vi on the planet Pandora. Neytiri finds Jake’s Na’vi avatar unresponsive in the forest and realizes that his human form is in the mobile lab.

She jumps through the shattered window to find him unconscious and near death, suffocating in Pandora’s atmosphere. Desperately placing the oxygen mask on his face, she watches as Jake comes to life, looks Neytiri in the eyes, and says, “I see you.” Neytiri, who prior to this point, has only seen Jake in his avatar form, smiles and responds tenderly, “I see you.”

To appreciate the fullness of this moment, understand that humans were the enemy to the Na’vi, appropriating and destroying their sacred planet. Neytiri had fallen in love with Jake in his avatar form and was devastated when she learned he was human. This love scene was the moment when masks, paradoxically, removed, and soul saw soul, regardless of form.

Etic vs. Emic

That’s the shift in perspective from etic to emic.

That’s the paradigm that can put the patient in the center of the healthcare team.

I have been lecturing about, and helping organizations become, trauma-informed since 2013, but only recently discovered the vocabulary of “etic vs emic” as two ways to understand human behavior. This language was first coined by Kenneth Pike, a linguistic theoretician, in 1954, with etic pertaining to objective findings and emic pertaining to the meaning behind a finding.

With regard to human behavior, particularly through biomedical lens, an etic approach looks at a problem from the outside in. It relies on objective criteria to make a diagnosis, which is consistent with the traditional allopathic model.

Take cigarette smoking, for example. An etic intake would include the patient’s age of smoking onset and packs smoked per year, and the diagnosis would be ICD-10 code F17.200: Nicotine dependence, unspecified, uncomplicated.

An emic approach would respond to that ICD-10 label with a snort; is cigarette smoking ever uncomplicated?! Because an emic approach looks at things from the patient’s perspective – or, from the inside out, so to speak. An emic intake to evaluate cigarette smoking would include understanding what was happening when a patient started to smoke, the good things that smoking does for the patient (“it calms me down…it distracts me from my pain”), the barriers to quitting and the level of desire to quit. Asking patients questions like these gets to what I like to call “the root of why.” It gets to the bottom of things and can be transformative.

The Importance of Personal Experience

Trauma-informed practice calls for shifting from etic to emic, from “What’s wrong with you?” to “What happened to you?” The kind of trauma I am writing about here is relational, as compared to situational trauma like a car accident or a hurricane. While trauma can occur at any age, it is particularly impactful in childhood, and much of the science generating evidence-based practice stems from the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) studies.

ACEs are common, cumulative and strongly associated with most of the leading causes of death in the U.S., as well as health risk behaviors like smoking, disordered eating and substance abuse. ACEs impact brain development, immune and hormonal systems, and even genetic expression – across the entire lifespan.

Positive events like growing up in a loving home, living in a safe space, and getting good at something counteract ACEs, again across the entire lifespan. In other words, our lived experience becomes our biology.

Walk a Mile in the Patient’s Shoes

That’s why it’s important to understand health concerns from the patient’s perspective. Research from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation found that 80 percent of health outcomes are the result of factors other than healthcare. Traumatic experiences and adverse community challenges play a big role in this.

When we take the time to step in the patient’s shoes, we have a better chance at understanding what is driving health outcomes – and how to intervene. After all, the patients are the experts of their own lives!

Affirming patients’ experiences and helping them connect the dots across their lives is healing and places them in the center of the healthcare team. It facilitates relationships that are empowering. It says, loud and clear, “I see you.”

Reflecting on Tennis Injuries, Urgent Care and Thought Leadership

How Brand Spokespeople can Inspire Confidence in Urgent Care Centers

My ladies’ doubles tennis team had its final match of the summer last week, and it turns out that my opponent was one of the same opponents I had three summers ago when I broke my wrist during my first match of the season.

Fortunately, we were able to play two sets this time. After the second set, she asked me if I once was injured at the beginning of a match a few years ago. I confirmed that was me who had an epic wipeout running for a ball that June in 2016.

I remembered I had blogged about the brand battle I had that day, driving around with one arm trying to figure out which urgent care center to go to.

Well, it’s been two years since that blog was posted. As I was re-reading it, I kept thinking about how much SPRYTE could contribute to a multi-location urgent care brand.

That’s because we’re hyperlocal healthcare PR experts. We’ve had a blast and done a great job building the reputation of Holy Redeemer Health System’s single Pediatric UrgiCare Center. And, we deploy a favorite consumer public relations strategy that other urgent care brands should consider: the Brand Spokesperson.

One example of this is our work to leverage Dr. Avi Gurwitz – a pediatrician at Holy Redeemer and medical director of its Pediatric UrgiCare Center – as an expert resource for local print and broadcast journalists. His extensive pediatric experience has made him a great go-to expert for a variety of health-related stories, including a Q&A segment on KYW-AM about spring sports and concussion prevention.

Additionally, Dr. Gurwitz has provided tips for families traveling during vacation season in an article by The Philadelphia Inquirer, and discussed cases he has seen in the UrgiCare Center to warn against trending risks like Lyme disease and the dangers of heavy backpacks.

So, what type of impression is made on Holy Redeemer’s potential pediatric patients when they see and hear knowledgeable, articulate and warm Dr. Gurwitz interviewed by broadcast and print healthcare journalists? We think it’s a very positive one that can make kids and their parents feel confident about the pediatric care they’ll receive from Dr. Gurwitz and his team.

While many people aren’t naturally-gifted spokespeople like Dr. Gurwitz, urgent care organizations should utilize this consumer marketing tactic as part of their integrated marketing strategies whenever possible. Large, brightly-lit signs and billboards don’t always build this type of confidence in your patient care team.

Retaining Medical Practice Talent

Healthcare Providers:  Show Employees Your Appreciation

Last month SPRYTE Business Development Director Margye Solomon attended the Pennsylvania MGMA’s Healthcare Leaders Summit, “Leading Beyond Limits” in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania.

The Pennsylvania MGMA is a local chapter of the MGMA (Medical Group Management Association.MGMA’s mission is “to empower practices, providers, and patients to create meaningful change in healthcare.”

More and more SPRYTE is supporting large, multi-location independent physician practices.  Margye got to learn all about their pain points at the Pennsylvania MGMA Healthcare Leader’s Summit.  Can you imagine what was at the top of the list of pain points?  Recruiting and retaining talent.

Recruiting and Retaining Talent is a Top Pain Point

With a tight labor market and the lowest unemployment rate in 50 years, retention may be even more challenging than recruiting.  Now, every employee has options never before imagined.

Retaining employees was a topic covered in the Conference Keynote Session, delivered by Leadership Expert Dr. Mary Kelly, a retired US Navy intelligence and logistics officer who spoke on “Leadership Prescriptions to Soar in 2019.”

Dr. Kelly asked the conferees three questions:

  1. Have you ever wished that everyone would come to work focused and ready to perform?
  2. Would you like your team to work more efficiently so you can leave the office earlier?
  3. Do you want to know how to motivate your top talent, including physicians, so they are more productive?

In her Blog, “Do Your Leaders take People for Granted,”  Dr. Kelly recaps the story of a longtime top employee at a medical practice whose exit shocks her manager.

The employee said, “I love my job and I love what I got to do. But I felt that the people around me didn’t even see me anymore. I felt like I was part of the furniture. I felt that they just assumed I would always be there to do everything I always handled. I stopped feeling appreciated years ago, but now I feel ignored. So, I am going to find another job.”  Just being there year after year without evolving wasn’t enough for this individual and there are many people like this employed at independent medical practices everywhere.

The 5-Minute Appreciation Plan

As part of her Keynote Session, Dr. Kelly took attendees through “The 5-Minute Goal Setting Plan,” designed to help practice managers grow in all aspects of business leadership and management.

One segment of the talk focused on “The 5-Minute Appreciation Plan.”

Dr. Kelly says, “When thanking people, please remember to show appreciation for a specific action, in a way that resonates with the recipient, and in a manner that doesn’t come at the expense of others.”  She shared 20 ways you can show appreciation to teammates, and employees.  Here are SPRYTE’s three favorites:

  • Thank the person who alerts you to a problem.  You cannot fix it if you don’t know about it.
  • Create a thank you white board or cork board, where people can publicly thank others for a specific action.
  • Encourage mental-health afternoons, where people are encouraged to get away from the office and do something fun and different.

According to Dr. Kelly, “If you are a manager or leader who wants to create a place where employees love to come to work, then you know that your employees want you to hear their ideas, understand their perspective and help them overcome organizational obstacles,”

Any commercial branding expert will tell you that employees are your number one brand ambassadors and that they have exponential potential to help you build a positive reputation for your practice in the community. These days you have to be more creative to keep employees.  It might start with showing more appreciation but, there are many ways employees can be developed and engaged.

SPRYTE Communications has a depth of experience in employee communications and engagement programs. Our SPRYTE team appreciated how Dr. Kelly broke down the topic for medical practice managers.  Now Margye is getting ready to represent SPRYTE at the New Jersey MGMA Practice Management Conference 2019, “Practice Management Roundup” in Atlantic City, New Jersey the first week of June.

We welcome the opportunity to chat with practice managers in need of communications support before then.

Just reach out to Margye:  msolomon@sprytecom.com 215.545.4715 x28

Building Strong Internal Support Strategies

Engaged Employees are Happier

The New England Society for Healthcare Communications (NESHCO)’s April healthcare communications webinar focused on keeping employees engaged with targeted, streamlined internal communications.

Employees that are connected to their leadership provide better patient care, and healthcare communicators should strive to set tones that resonate with every doctor, nurse, administrator, and staff member.

Establish Trust with Your Audience

Actionable internal communications start by articulating a mission and generating a vision, i.e., being your patients’ choice for the most coordinated and personalized care.

The first step is to establish trust with your audience. Rather than using a corporate voice, it should be more relatable. Healthcare organizations have diverse workforces that may be working in many different locations, so messages should also be localized, yet integrated.

What Do Employees Want to Know?

The webinar presenter used surveys to learn more about what resonates with employees, with some surprising answers. Number one was employee benefits, followed by job-related information, including how to fill out specific forms. Employees also wanted to know about short and long-term company strategies and leadership announcements.

Most employees get their information from emails and speaking with managers in small groups (huddles); old school methods like leaving flyers in cafeterias or mailboxes are no longer relevant. Emails work especially well when tailored for different employees.

One of the examples was a “Manager’s Minute” piece that contained:

  1. news
  2. action items
  3. links that provided guidance to help managers feel comfortable with complex topics.

These emails were especially useful for managers to prepare for employee huddles. They are now seen as trusted communicators who share valuable knowledge that benefits employees.

Really, Who Has Time to Read?

Today’s employee newsletters drive their points home when they have:

  1. Less text
  2. More pictures
  3. Useful links
  4. Relevant content

Employees may not always have time to read, so the messages should be bright and accessible, focusing on things they care about. Details about employee discounts, hyper-local information, financial wellness, even healthy recipes and desk exercises may align with their interests.

Digital signs are another useful tool that can integrate messages, videos, and other internal communications. The webinar presenter discussed the company’s TV show, which is shown on their digital signage. A “Patient Experience Week” segment highlighted emotional patient success stories, volunteer work, and employee awards. Employees are encouraged to share these experiences responsibly, following company social media policy. It is also important to keep this media in employee-facing areas, since it may not be geared for patient viewing.

The Value of Metrics

Metrics provide tactical guidance for healthcare communicators, and are integral to internal communications. These platforms can measure what percentages of employees open emails, and which are clicked through and read. This information can be broken down by the type of employee as well.  Results can then be compared to initial surveys, to see if they are in alignment. Interpreting metrics to tailor internal communications can streamline messages so that your employees will want to read them. Why?  Because it is content that they care about.

There’s Still Time to Make Changes for 2019

Take Stock. Break Bad Habits & Do Better

In 8 Bad Habits to Avoid in Healthcare Marketing this week’s guest blogger, Rob Rosenberg of Springboard Brand and Creative Strategy, warns “Avoid defaulting to old habits that weaken your position, both personally and professionally.”

Do you agree that the poor practices Rob advocates you change are often present in today’s health system marcom operations?

They reminded me of my first position in provider healthcare. My title was Public Affairs Staff Associate and I worked in the market’s dominant three hospital health system. I was one of three in the department. We had all the health system service lines divided among us. Thinking back, I don’t think I was ever present at a business discussion. But I did perfect my newsletter skills. –Lisa Simon

Click here to read the Guest Blog

 

Remembering the “Social” Aspect of Social Media

How to Use Social Media to Build Meaningful Relationships with Patients

Social media has evolved into one of the most important ways businesses across all industries can connect with consumers, and the healthcare industry is no exception. In fact, one recent study showed that 57 percent of people choose their healthcare providers based on their social media presence – proving how integral social media is to the overall patient experience.

While most providers know how vital social media is to their success, many find themselves still struggling to truly engage with their followers. In an effort to prove their level of prestige and experience, they often focus too much of their content on clinical topics and forget about the human, “caring” side of healthcare.

So, how can healthcare organizations build meaningful relationships with their followers by bringing back the social part of social media? Below are a few tips to help healthcare providers tap into their emotional side and establish lasting connections with their patients.

 Showcase employees.

When selecting a doctor, patients tend to choose a physician who they feel they can trust and build a connection with. While most doctors don’t have time to get to know their patients during appointments, social media has created another way for them to become more of a familiar face outside of the office.

One example of this is client Holy Redeemer Health System’s recurring “Practitioner Spotlight” social media series. Back in July, we published a blog post about how we use this series to highlight a different physician each week by sharing a photo of the doctor and summary of his or her practice, experience and hobbies. This series still garners the most engagement from followers compared to the rest of Holy Redeemer’s posts, as it allows them get to know their doctors beyond what’s listed on the website.

Share patient-centered content.

Posting relatable content is one of the best ways a healthcare brand can engage with consumers – and there’s nothing more relatable than posts involving other patients. When a provider posts about its patients, it helps followers “see themselves” in the content and feel as if the organization understands who they are as a person.

Along with the Practitioner Spotlight series, content that showcases patients receives high levels of engagement on Holy Redeemer’s social media pages. From photos of an “Eagles pep rally” held in its maternity ward before last year’s Super Bowl to an article about a puppy parade visiting residents at one of its senior living facilities, sharing positive patient stories allows them to consistently resonate with followers in an emotional way.

Use a professional and empathetic voice.

In addition to learning more about a provider, people often reach out on social media because they are worried about something related to their health. While it’s important for providers to show that they’re knowledgeable, it’s just as crucial to be empathetic when talking to their followers, as well. Patients look to practitioners as trusted resources when they aren’t feeling well, so using a professional and comforting voice will help them feel less hesitant about seeking care when they’re experiencing health issues.

Be as responsive as possible.

One of the most important, yet forgotten aspects of a brand’s social media pages is that they act as a way for consumers to have direct communication with the organization. If a business doesn’t respond to its messages or comments – especially negative ones – it can create the impression that it doesn’t truly care about its followers.

Whenever possible, aim to respond to any negative comments or messages within an hour of when it’s posted. Even if you don’t have the necessary information right away and have to give a “non-answer,” responding promptly will help patients believe that their concerns are heard and being taken seriously.

When used correctly, social media is one of the best ways for healthcare providers to connect and build relationships with their current and prospective patients outside of the doctor’s office.

When Your Patients are Asian-American

Cultural Competency is Critical

Asian Americans come from more than 50 countries, speak more than 100 different languages, and belong to diverse ethnic groups, each with their own cultural values and healthcare needs.

The term Asian American encompasses a wide diversity of cultures. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, 5.6% of the U.S. population identifies as Asian or Asian American.

In their Blog Tips for Healthcare Communication with Asian-American Audiences MTM LinguaSoft, a language services company that specializes in helping healthcare providers communicate effectively with multilingual audiences wrote, “Many Asian Americans place a strong emphasis on family ties and interpersonal relationships. The family becomes a source of identity and guidance during times of crisis, and individuals are often expected to demonstrate self-control during difficult situations. Individualistic, disruptive behavior is discouraged.”

We appreciate MTM LinguaSoft’s Kristin Lynch guest blogging for SPRYTE Communications this week. Her Blog explains why healthcare providers should understand that Asian American families value group consensus when making important medical decisions and that respect is demonstrated differently in their cultures.

Cultural competency isn’t a new concept but it’s ever important as patients have more and more options and healthcare providers, who are judged by the “experiences” of their patients, compete in an increasingly diverse marketplace.

Read Kristin Lynch’s guest blog here.

Partnering Makes Healthcare PR Less Lonely

Collaborate to Share Work and Celebrate Success

Public relations can be a lonely function, especially when we bear the weight of delivering earned media for healthcare provider clients in major markets.  It requires high doses of adrenalin and drive, assuming your material is newsworthy on its own merit.

Recently at SPRYTE we’ve been enthusiastic about the opportunity to collaborate with other healthcare communicators because the physicians we support are themselves collaborating with innovative partners.

Our portfolio includes work for both independent doctors in private practice and non-profit hospitalists.

Relievus and NeuroFlow Advancing Management of Pain Patients

Dr. Young Lee, founding partner of Relievus, a multi-location pain management specialty medical practice, collaborated with local Philadelphia start up NeuroFlow to test a mobile software platform that patients check in with daily.  NeuroFlow gives providers daily insight into patients’ mental health – a key indicator for care plan adherence.

In mHealthIntelligence,  a mental health and telehealth online publication targeted to healthcare practitioners, Dr Lee said, “We used to document (a patient’s mental status), but we didn’t do anything about it. Now we’re paying attention to mental health and we’re realizing that pain is not just a physical issue. This is a physical and mental issue.”

Our clients at Relievus asked SPRYTE to work with NeuroFlow to help their experienced public relations consultant deliver earned media about their platform.  NeuroFlow needed real life examples of doctors using NeuroFlow in the field and Dr. Lee was an early adopter and an enthusiastic partner to NeuroFlow.

As can be imagined, our biggest challenge was finding time in Dr. Lee’s schedule for media interviews.  The opportunities had already been sourced by NeuroFlow and they were good ones.  We just had to step in and deliver the doctor.  So, in addition to the placement in mHealthIntelligence, Dr. Lee and Relievus’ use of NeuroFlow were also featured in the Camden Courier Post the daily newspaper serving the practice’s flagship headquarters location in Cherry Hill, New Jersey.

Of course, doctors in private practice aren’t the only ones pursuing collaborations that positively impact patient care.

AirXpander®  Revolutionizes Patients’ Preparation for Reconstructive Breast Surgery.

Our longtime clients at Holy Redeemer Heath System asked us to support Chief of Surgery Dr. William Scarlett and his use of an innovative approach to preparing a patient for reconstructive breast surgery, the use of a new medical device, AirXpander®


In this case, SPRYTE’s collaboration was directly with the manufacturer, AeroFlow  The marketing team was delighted by the potential for consumer earned media and available and helpful every step of the way.

First, they confirmed Dr. Scarlett was the first and only physician using AirXpander® in the greater Philadelphia market.  And we needed that confirmation to make the claim.

We were also supplied with great imagery and solid explanations of the product to expand what Dr. Scarlett shared with us.

But what Holy Redeemer delivered was key to the success of our consumer media outreach, a wonderful and satisfied patient spokesperson who was thrilled with Dr. Scarlett and her AirXpander experience.

Patient Miriam Dougherty’s willingness to be interviewed on camera with Dr. Scarlett was critical to SPRYTE’s delivery of a television feature segment on Philadelphia’s number one rated local network 6ABC 

So, in these two SPRYTE examples, public relations wasn’t so lonely.  In the case of Relievus, we saw another communications pro work his magic but he needed Dr. Lee to deliver a solid story to both consumer and trade media.  SPRYTE’s advocacy for Relievus and our expert coordination and facilitation skills led to two excellent earned media placements for both businesses.

With Holy Redeemer we secured the earned media opportunities and worked with the physician and patient spokespeople with the enthusiastic support of the device manufacturer.  

Most collaborators will tell you that communication among partners is critical to success and we agree.  Clearing up any blurred breakdowns of responsibility is job number one.  When they work, collaborations are truly a beautiful thing.  Pursuing client goals with other healthcare communicators and delivering results together is energizing and those earned media placements are a great way to stoke doctors’ continued interest in earned media, highlighting their successful approaches to patient care in the most credible way while building the brands of their healthcare provider organizations.

The Media Advisory is a Critical Tool

Healthcare Providers in Pursuit of TV Coverage Need to Nail Them

What we refer to as a Media Advisory at SPRYTE Communications is also sometimes called a Media Alert or a Calendar Alert. Whatever you call it, the Media Advisory is a critical media relations tool for encouraging television news coverage of a single event or function.

For many healthcare communicators, in large and small media markets alike, winning television coverage can be elusive.

You have to think like a producer and succinctly present the opportunity for the cameras to shoot very strong visuals, the kind you see every night on TV news. The following factors are also important and can make or break a TV opportunity:

  • Day of the Week: SPRYTE likes a Tuesday, Wednesday or a Thursday.
  • Time of Day: We like mid late morning.
  • Proximity to News Station: If it’s more than a 30-minute drive, that adds challenge.

Here are some of the shortcomings of Media Advisories I’ve seen written at SPRYTE over the years:

  •  Visuals aren’t mentioned.
  •  Headlines lack creativity.
  •  Dispassionate.
  •  A specific time for the main “moment” isn’t given.
  •  Longer than one page.
  •  Written like a News Release.
  •  Lacking parking and entrance instructions.

We do a lot of Media Advisory training actually, more than I would have expected for both seasoned and more junior pros with media relations responsibilities. The reasons these folks need training?

  • Don’t ever watch television news.
  • Don’t sell it.
  • Value print over broadcast coverage.

When You Hear the Anchor Use Your Words

When the TV Anchor uses your words to accompany the video their cameraperson shot at your event from the anchor desk, you know you wrote good ones.

That was the case in December when SPRYTE reached out to televisions news assignment desks in pursuit of their coverage of an intimate and humble graduation ceremony for a large faith-based social service agency it represents in Southeast Pennsylvania.

Two adults completing Episcopal Community ServicesRISE Initiative were celebrated at a non-traditional recognition ceremony.
SPRYTE’s Media Advisory  enticed Philadelphia’s number one rated local television news station, 6 ABC, to send a cameraman to cover the program.

The resulting television news segment included favorite local anchorwoman 6 ABC’s Monica Malpass including words from SPRYTE’s Media Advisory headline.

Part of our earned media strategy for Episcopal Community Services includes attempting to win coverage of key milestones in their program year including RISE Initiative completion recognition programs for the following reasons:

Reasons to Pursue TV News Coverage

  • Shows (rather than tells) their great organization in action.
  •  Simplifies a multi-faceted mission by focusing on one great, visual moment.
  • Covers a wide geography.
  • Affirms donors’ good decision to support you.
  • Boosts morale of program participants and staff alike.
  • Builds the organization’s brand in the community in a visible way.

Remember sometimes the cameras don’t show up to even the most inspiring, visually-charged and meaningful events. We all know that can happen. But if we think there is potential for a great TV story that will be enjoyed by viewers throughout our media market, we will try at all costs to get the coverage again next time too.

Spryte Communications