Mark Your Calendar!

Using Community Calendars to Promote Your Healthcare Event or Fundraiser

There’s a pivotal moment in the classic baseball movie “Field of Dreams” when Kevin Costner is standing in the midst of a cornfield and hears a voice say: “If you build it, he will come.”

With the support of his loving wife, played by Amy Madigan (and despite many questions about his sanity), he builds a baseball diamond on his cornfield and is soon visited by the incarnations of long-dead baseball greats reuniting to play ball.

As a healthcare communicator, you may need to have as much diligence and perseverance in promoting your healthcare screening, charitable fundraiser or community recognition event in order to achieve maximum interest and attendance.

As you are devising your earned media strategy, don’t overlook the value of good old-fashioned citizen journalism. Community calendar listings can be a  free and practical way to reach your targeted community supporters.

Do Your Homework

It sounds simple. Go online. Locate a website. Post your information. Those are the basics. Of course, there’s a bit more to it.

In other words, you’ll need to do some homework.

As with any marketing effort, you will first need to define your audience. Who are you targeting? Are you segmenting by geography? By demographics? By topic/interest? By income? Clearly establishing who you want to reach will help you decide on the best way to reach them.

Next you will want to determine the range of calendar listing opportunities that are available to you. Start with your local mainstream media. Local daily, weekly and independent community newspapers and broadcast television and radio stations often maintain community calendars on their websites that consumers can access and post to. (Note: We are seeing a growing trend in which websites require users to select a permanent User Name and Password in order to access calendar posting applications. Make sure to keep a running list of the sites, the User Name you select and your Password for future use. Or you can utilize a reliable Password app. You’ll save yourself a lot of time and trouble.)

If there isn’t a special community calendar, you might try sending in your information as a news tip. Often there is a special “newstips” email listed under the contact section. Or you can try to look up the local community news editor, if there is one.

Audience Interests

Who are you trying to reach with your message/event?  People interested in health or fitness tips or information? Senior citizens? Mothers or mothers-to-be? Parents with school age children? Family members of patients with cancer, cardio-pulmonary or other illnesses?

See if there are local support or special interest groups aligned with your topic or interest that might consider posting your information or making it available to their members.

One way to get a quick idea of what’s out there is to do a Google search: Type in “Community Calendar” and your relevant zip code.

The Message

The main thing, of course, is to make sure your target audience is getting accurate up-to-date information. For community calendar listings, it’s easy to put together a basic message containing the Who, What, Where and When that can be copied and pasted for the various sites.

Depending on the site, you may have to spend some time inputting specific information, particularly if your event or program runs over multiple dates. Make sure you have the proper times and locations, as well. (The simplest details can be the easiest to overlook.)

Also, make sure to provide a contact where interested persons may obtain additional information or clarification of details. Ideally you’ll have one person designated as your information contact, along with their name, email and/or phone number.

As a final touch, make sure to include your logo or some other visual that reflects your organization (or brand) or graphically supports the message and theme of your event.

Event planning is no field of dreams. Just because you’re willing to stage a special event doesn’t automatically mean people will come. You still need to make them aware of the event and why it’s important for them to attend.

In a lot of ways an effective community calendar program is like playing “small ball” baseball.  You’re not swinging for the fences. You’re bunting, running, singling and scoring by doing all the little things right. But that still takes preparation, alertness and the determination to get the job done.

Philadelphia Opioid Crisis: An Approach to Save Lives

 

All Hands on Deck Against the Opioid Threat

One of the most serious public health issues facing us today is the opioid crisis. As the crisis has continued to grow over the course of the past decade, its impact is far-reaching in terms of financial losses as well as human costs.

As medical professionals and public policy officials strive to find answers to this continually growing problem, it is incumbent on healthcare communicators to be ready to work with their respective partners to develop strategies to reach out and bring together those impacted by this dreadful epidemic – not only abusers, but loved ones, family members, healthcare professionals, community leaders, elected officials and more.

Opioid Crisis by the Numbers

In November, a report from the Council of Economic Advisers estimated that in 2015, the economic cost of the opioid crisis was $504 billion, or 2.8% of the nation’s Gross Domestic Product that year. That number was more than six times larger than the previous estimated cost of the epidemic.

Prescription opioids are a particular problem. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), prescription opioids are a key contributor to the opioid epidemic in the United States, accounting for more than 40% of all U.S. opioid overdose deaths in 2016, with more than 46 people dying every day from overdoses involving prescription opioids. 

In Philadelphia, the impact of the opoioid epidemic has been devastating. According to the city’s Department of Health, fatal drug overdoses from 2013-2015 increased by more than 50%, from 459 deaths to 702. During 2015, Philadelphia experienced more than twice as many deaths from drug overdose than from homicide. Eighty percent (80%) of these involved opioids.

What’s to be Done?

Recently, the Healthcare Leadership Network of the Delaware Valley convened a CEO Roundtable, hosted by Cooper University Health System, on what can be done to deal with the many challenges posed by the opioid epidemic. The panel discussion sought to offer perspectives from clinical, public health, governmental policy, health system and evidence-based treatment points of view. The general consensus – there were many contributing factors to the problem and it will take a dedicated commitment of coordinated effort to bring about an effective solution.

Dr. Susan Freeman, President & CEO of Temple University’s Center for Population Health, described her organization’s approach as an “all hands on deck” effort to address many of the multi-faceted issues exacerbated by opioid abuse. Temple’s Substance Abuse Task Force Action Plan, for example, focuses on six primary areas:

  • Building trust with patients/substance abusers
  • Ceasing addiction
  • Proactively identifying patients at risk
  • Reviewing physician prescription practices
  • Education and research
  • Partnerships with entities such as the Philadelphia Department of Health and other like-minded organizations.

Focus on Families

Similarly, Douglas Tieman, president & CEO of Caron Treatment Centers, noted it’s important to remember that substance abuse is a chronic disease that doesn’t end after a 28-day rehab visit. The most effective treatments are multi-disciplinary, including medication-assisted therapy, bio-psycho-social treatment, evidence-based treatment programs such as motivational interviewing, 12-step integration, trauma and family counseling, and a continuing care plan to lessen the chances of recidivism.

Such integrated approaches can have long-term positive effects. If behavioral health, substance abuse and mental health issues are treated in time, “the costs of other health-related issues go way down as well,” he said.

Even so, getting patients and families to participate in long-term programs can be a challenge in itself.

“We live in a microwave society that wants everything immediately,” noted Alan Oberman, CEO of John Brooks Recovery Center. “Most families, unfortunately are dealing with a ‘crisis of now’ and aren’t willing to listen to discussions of long-term chronic issues.”

A Center for Healing

Adrienne Kirby, PhD and chairman and CEO of Cooper University Health Care, said her long-term goal was to create at Cooper a “center for healing” that would address many of the related factors that contribute to problems faced by substance abusers. She said Cooper has been on the front lines, working with Camden County Police, to identify and reach out to patients in need. She said intervention needs to be combined with treatment, as well as other support services, such as housing.

Another key aspect of Cooper Health’s approach is to upgrade the curriculum so that students, residents, as well as faculty, are trained to recognize and treat substance abuse patients effectively.

Information is Key

A key challenge to implementing a coordinated strategy is the sharing of information. In addition to HIPAA regulations, the infrastructure simply doesn’t exist yet to allow the exchange of bio-social information among health care entities and community-based support organizations.

“We don’t have the infrastructure for mental health that we have in physical health,” said Dr. Kirby. “The law doesn’t allow us to be there yet.”

Nevertheless, such an information-sharing capability could help ensure that substance abuse patients receive the continuing care and social support they need. For example, with patients’ permission, telemedicine apps could combine with GPS to manage patients’ long-term illnesses, monitor their activities and ensure they are complying with what is needed to maintain a healthy recovery.

Information can be even more important in terms of prevention – stopping substance abusers before they get started. Caron, for example, works with 600 grade schools and high schools to educate students about the dangers of substance abuse. According to Caron’s Tieman, if students can be persuaded to postpone their introduction to alcohol, marijuana and other substances, it can significantly delay the onset of substance abuse.

There is no panacea. The opioid epidemic has been years in the making and will no doubt take years to overcome. In the meantime, healthcare communicators who work with organizations involved in the issue need to keep abreast of news and developments so they can provide their respective audiences with timely information and advice.

 

Consumerism: The Future of Healthcare

Patient-Focused Care is a Growing Challenge

Even before the advent of the Affordable Care Act, a primary goal for healthcare providers has been to get consumers more involved in their own healthcare decisions.

From the now-defunct federal Health Systems Agencies (the original HSAs), to Health Maintenance Organizations (HMOs), to Flexible Spending Accounts, to Health Savings Accounts (the new HSAs), to the more recent Accountable Care Entities, engaging and empowering consumers to make informed choices about their healthcare needs has been both an ongoing objective and challenge.

Healthcare communicators, who are at the heart of providers’ consumer relations and community relations efforts, need to understand what’s driving this important movement.

 

Key Drivers of Healthcare Consumerism

In a recent webinar sponsored by Thomas Jefferson University’s Jefferson College of Population Health and IBM Watson Health, Dr. David B. Nash, dean of the college, noted that the two biggest factors driving the evolution of healthcare consumerism are utilization and costs.

Dr. Nash pointed to data from 2015 showing that the total expenditure for healthcare in the U.S. topped $3.2 trillion, accounting for 17.8% of the country’s gross domestic product. Per capita national health expenditures amounted to almost $10,000. Almost 60% of those expenditures were tied to two areas of spending: Hospital Care (32.3%) and Professional Services (26.2%).

One key problem, he noted, is quality. More “socialized” national systems found in Canada and Europe provide consumers with better quality at a better price compared to the U.S. health system. At the same time, U.S. consumers are shouldering more of the total healthcare cost burden, including unanticipated costs. According to the Kaiser Family Foundation, U.S. workers’ share of health insurance premiums grew 221% since 1999, while premiums themselves increased 203%.

From a healthcare finance perspective, it’s an unsustainable situation. Empowering consumers to exercise more control over their healthcare spending is part of the solution.

 

More Education, Transparency Needed

Unfortunately, too many consumers don’t understand what they’re paying for – or how they’re paying for it. Lack of awareness about insurance terms, processes and pricing tend to inhibit patients from getting involved more directly in their healthcare decisions.

“If you can’t define what a copayment is, you won’t be an empowered consumer,” Dr. Nash explained.

Consumers want to understand what is happening, but available data can be overwhelming. Many are turning to social and public sources for information, but lack the ability to translate the data in a meaningful way that would help their decision-making.

 

Social Determinants of Health (SDOH)

Other key factors driving the evolution of healthcare consumerism are social determinants that describe conditions in which people live, learn, work and play – all of which can have significant impact on an individual’s health risks and outcomes.

Poverty, not surprisingly, is the number one social determinant of health. Those without insurance, or access to regular healthcare checkups inevitably fare worse in terms of early detection of adverse conditions and ensuing complications, chronic health issues, and life expectancy.

A recent Robert Wood Johnson Foundation survey asked American physicians what kind of prescriptions they wish they could write to assist patients with social needs. Among their top answers: Fitness Programs (75%), Nutritional Food (64%), and Transportation Assistance (47%). For doctors whose patients were predominantly urban and low-income, the responses were just as telling: Employment Assistance (52%), Adult Education (49%), and Housing Assistance (43%).

 

Engagement is Key

To help address many of these needs, many health systems are increasing their focus on community-based care, meeting patients closer to where they live and addressing their individual needs. This trend can be seen in a number of ways:

  • Increasingly, large regional health systems are affiliating with traditional community hospitals, based on level, type of condition or geography.
  • The popularity and prevalence of retail clinics continues to grow, as health systems see a means to deliver lower-cost local services beyond primary care.
  • Bedless hospitals are springing up – newer entities that are often multi-specialty and offer traditional hospital services except for inpatient care.
  • The BCBS Institute is partnering with the ridesharing company Lyft to address transportation-based SDOH. The Institute and Lyft will work together to coordinate rides in neighborhoods with limited public transit access and low rates of vehicle ownership.
  • The growing popularity of telehealth, mobile technology and digital therapeutics, that allow physicians to provide lower cost care and regularly monitor their patients’ progress almost anywhere at any time.

In addition, spending more time with patients – encouraging them to ask questions, taking time to explain procedures, treatments and options – can be a major factor in improving healthcare outcomes individually and in the community. Healthcare insurance professionals can also play an important role by working closely with consumers to make sure they understand options and nuances involved in their insurance decisions.

Healthcare communicators have a major role to play as well, by paying close attention to the evolving nature of healthcare consumerism and working with their colleagues – healthcare administrators, physicians, nurses and other medical professionals, as well as their allies throughout the community – to reach out, identify and educate consumers to ensure as many as possible get the care and support they need to live healthy, happy lives.