5 Tips for Healthcare Marketing to Hispanic Audiences

Investing in Cultural Competence is Key

It sounds simple. In order to communicate with someone effectively, it’s best to speak to them in their own language. That’s a marketing axiom. For healthcare marketing, it’s vital.

When reaching out to audiences with a different ethnic or cultural background, it is important to appreciate exactly how those differences might impact your message – or your intended message.

For example, in conjunction with the observance of Juneteenth, SPRYTE posted a special blog telling about the history of the holiday and noting how African Americans may have different attitudes and perspectives in regard to certain healthcare services (we focused on hospice) and healthcare professionals, due largely to different life and culturual experiences.

Whether your target audience is African American, Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Indian, Russian or an other nationality or culture, it’s important to understand the nuances that can affect how your message is received.

Our colleagues at MTM LinguaSoft, a language services company that specializes in helping businesses communicate effectively with multilingual audiences, posted a blog that offered some important insights: “5 Tips for Healthcare Marketing to Hispanic Audiences.”

We think you will enjoy it! Read!

How to Write an Obituary: Preparing a Lasting Tribute

A Good Obituary Remembers the Living as Well as Those Lost

At times in our professional careers – and in our personal lives – we may be called upon to craft an obituary for a professional acquaintance, colleague, friend or loved one.

As a communications consulting firm, we have worked with hospice clients in developing appropriate guidelines for such sensitive messages. In addition, we occasionally are asked to put together such tributes on behalf of a company executive, board member or respected volunteer who has passed.

It can be a daunting challenge – where to start?

Contemplating one simple question can serve as a practical starting point:  How would you like to be remembered?

At its most fundamental level, an obituary serves several functions. It’s a notification that someone has passed. It’s an account of the life they’ve lived, as well as the range of people whose lives they’ve touched – not only extended family but special friends, acquaintances and others. It also provides important news and directions for planned services or funeral arrangements. Sometimes it can contain special thanks to caregivers or friends who were there in a time of need. It might also be an opportunity to suggest where charitable donations can be given in a loved one’s memory.

Moving Beyond the Basic

Still, at its best, an obituary is a tribute to a life well-lived and a person well-loved.

Remember that you’re not just reporting information. You’re telling the story of someone’s life. Of course to do that, you’ll need to gather basic information.

By talking with loved ones you should be able to get the basics: age, occupation, education, military service, where they were born, places they lived.

Try to get an appreciation of their lives by looking through different lenses. What were their interests? What sports or hobbies did they enjoy? What about community involvement or faith-based activity?  What charity events did they promote or support? What were their most important or impressive accomplishments?

Adding Some Color

Instead of a formal interview, you may find that family members or friends will respond better in more relaxed conversations. Give them time to think and reminisce in an informal, comfortable setting. Get them to tell interesting stories about their interactions with the loved one who has passed. The goal is to give readers insights into what made that person special. Maybe it’s a special trait of character like a short fuse or a sense of humor that brings a smile to a loved ones’ face. Maybe they’ll talk about the individual’s sense of modesty, community-mindedness, generosity, love of travel and so on.

With those memories as your palette, try to paint a word picture of who this person was and what they meant to the world, their friends and their loved ones. Don’t just say that so-and-so was a good person. Show the reader by describing their interactions and the energy they put into those aspects of their lives they held most important.

As you round out the obituary, you’ll need to determine which family members to include – those who preceded them in death, as well as surviving relatives and other loved ones. How far back does the family want to go? Be extra careful about accidentally omitting people: grandparents (both sides, living as well as deceased), step-families, aunts and uncles, significant others, and of course, children, grandchildren and more, if needed.

Remember that those who are giving you information for the obituary have lots of other things on their mind. Be extra careful not to hurt anyone’s feelings with an unintended omission. Finally, find out if there is a specific charity or other cause the family wants to single out for memorial donations.

Adapting to Fit the Need

Consider creating several different versions/lengths for the obituary – a short one for a paid ad, and a longer one that could be used as a handout at the eulogy or funeral service. Check with your local newspaper for appropriate publishing lengths. With genealogy so popular, you might consider an even longer one to offer some family history, or to post on a website.

Also, make sure to proofread the finished work. Better yet, have a family member or other knowledgeable person review the finished copy for accuracy and completeness.

Dealing with Unfortunate Realities

Finally, keep in mind that, unfortunately, there are unscrupulous people in this world who look to prey on the vulnerable. Be careful about including information that might be used for identity theft, or that might make someone vulnerable for exploitation. Depending where you live, you may want to avoid identifying the address of the surviving spouse, or even the time of the funeral, as would-be burglars sometimes scan obituaries so they can target what they think will be an unwatched house.

The bottom line: be compassionate, be complete, but also be careful.

Published October 24, 2017 by Spryte Communications in Public Affairs

Harness the Exclusive

A Scoop Can Yield Results

When planning an earned media campaign for your organization, keep in mind the power of the exclusive. It can be used to forge a relationship with a reporter, or strengthen an existing one. And in our experience it might increase the odds of your news or story getting published or aired if the media outlet knows it is the only or first one who has the information.

At SPRYTE, we’ve cultivated many terrific relationships with healthcare writers both locally and in key trade publications and blogs. So when we have a strong story pitch or a timely news announcement for a client, one of the first things we ask ourselves is “Is there a key reporter we can offer this to as an exclusive?”

Usually, the answer will be obvious: that journalist whose outlet is most local or most relevant to the client. Other times, we’ll offer it to a friendly writer who previously covered the client. They might be one and the same, or they might be different.

A Laughing Matter: Nitrous Oxide

A recent example came when our client, a regional health system, became the first in the area to offer nitrous-oxide, aka laughing gas, to mothers laboring in the delivery room. Ni-Ox is a game-changer, as patients can personally control the flow of gas during active labor, and is completely safe for mother and child. It also hasn’t become widespread yet, so we knew there’d be interest.

We pitched a story including an in-person interview with the hospital’s director of women’s health, to the Bucks County Courier Times, a nearby daily with a readership that contributes a significant number of the hospital’s expectant mothers. The resulting story got prominent play in the paper’s health section, with multiple photos, and noted our client’s focus on giving patients more choices in their care.

But we were far from done. We then pitched the story to the Philadelphia Business Journal, the area’s most important business publication. As they don’t compete directly with the daily newspaper, we felt comfortable again offering it “exclusively.” That story ran three weeks after the other one.

And we are currently working with one of the local network affiliates on a story, which when it comes to fruition will be a local TV exclusive.

Because you’re putting all your marbles in one sack with this approach, it requires some patience, and it’s important to allow some time at the start of a campaign for this window of exclusivity, before going out with your news more broadly. Here are some other things to keep in mind when going this route:

Keep the needs of the media in mind. This might mean deferring to their timeline once you’ve made the offer (this is where the patience comes in).

Exclusive doesn’t mean “only.” Most journalists understand that it simply means they’re getting first crack, but others might follow. And they’re almost always fine with that.

Expand your view of “exclusive.” As we did with the Nitrous-Oxide news, we offered it as a daily newspaper exclusive, a business press exclusive, and a television exclusive. You can also offer an idea as:

  • A trade media exclusive
  • A radio exclusive
  • An online/blog exclusive
  • A local exclusive
  • A national news exclusive

You can even offer these simultaneously, as long as none of the outlets directly competes with one of the others.

Use exclusives strategically. If you offer them to the same reporter over and over, they might lose their luster, and you’re missing an opportunity to build other relationships. Also, there might be times when an exclusive is not appropriate, like when your client has vital or timely information. Examples include tips for protecting yourself during an epidemic, or how the organization is responding to a data breach or cyber-attack.

Keep your word. Once you make an exclusive offer, you are obligated to stand by it and not approach a competing media outlet with the same idea. Violate this at the risk of harming the relationship.

Follow up, but be ready to move on. Contact the journalist once or twice after you offer the exclusive, to gauge interest. If they waffle, or don’t respond, send a final note saying something like “if it’s OK, I’d like to go ahead and offer this idea to another publication as I haven’t heard definitively from you.” Wait one more day, then do it.

The medical exclusive can be a valuable tool when embarking on a campaign. If you manage it properly, it can be a win-win for the reporter and your organization.

“And Doctor of the Year Goes To…”

Exploiting Awards to Boost Reputation

Awards programs can be powerful tools to generate positive press – and much goodwill – for the practitioners in your healthcare organization, and possibly the organization itself. Just about every local business or regional lifestyle publication has a “Top Docs” feature, or recognitions for “Top Hospitals” or “Best Places to Work.”

To capitalize, it helps to plan ahead. By creating a calendar of opportunities suitable for your organization, paying special attention to deadlines, you’ll be able to stay atop these programs and plan your nominations in advance. For institutional awards, you can mobilize your workforce to provide testimonials or vote.

When entering, it’s vital to follow the online nomination instructions fully, and pay particular attention to the narrative portion, usually the crux of your submission.

Heroes of Healthcare

SPRYTE recently spearheaded a regional health system’s nominations for NJBIZ magazine’s “Healthcare Heroes” award. Categories included Hospital of the Year, Educator of the Year, Public Health Hero and several others. We focused on the Physician, Nurse, and Volunteer of the Year categories.

We put out the call for prospective nominees, and the client came back with three excellent choices. After nailing down the particulars of each candidate, we set about writing the narratives which, again, would make or break our entries.

Here are some things to keep in mind, based on SPRYTE’s long experience and track record of awards success on behalf of our healthcare clients:

  • Don’t hold back. Sometimes the essays must be brief, but we had up to 1,000 words to make our case. There will be much to say about any good nominee, so take full advantage of the space provided.
  •  Interview the candidate personally. If you rely on their CV, your submission will sound it and likely fail to garner attention. Find out what makes them tick, the “why” behind the “what.” Why did he or she choose that field, or job? Who (or what) influenced them? Get anecdotes illustrating their compassion, service and empathy. Tell a story.
  •  Provide the whole picture. Your candidate might be a great doc/nurse/teacher, but there are lots of those. What does yours do outside of patient work to benefit the community and humanity? In the end, you need to answer the question, “Why is this practitioner deserving of this award above all others?”
  •  Interview your nominee’s colleagues. At the very least, speak to the person who nominated them, or a direct supervisor. They had a reason for choosing that person. Find out why. Consider including a direct quote in the narrative.
  •  Don’t forget references. Sometimes awards forms require one or more. These can be the nominator, a supervisor, an executive of the organization, a professional colleague, or a patient. Let the references know you’re including them and prep them in case they are contacted.
  •  Don’t Compete Against Yourself: Keep nominations one per category.
  •  Enlist your patients and staff. Rally the troops, especially for organizational awards like Best Places to Work. Use internal communications, social media and e-blasts requesting testimonials, and include a link to comment or vote. Some of these awards are a numbers game, so leave no stone unturned.
  •  Have fun. Often, publications name finalists soon after the deadline, then announce winners at a paid banquet later. If possible, the nominee should attend to (hopefully) accept the award in person. Even as a finalist, it’s their night to shine! If colleagues can go, even better.
  •  Promote your win. A news release about an award bestowed by one publication won’t be picked up by a competing media outlet, but you can still publicize the victory in the winner’s hometown newspaper, college alumni publication, professional journals, and newsletters of organizations or chambers to which they belong. And, of course, post the happy news on the organization’s own social media channels and website.

With some planning, thought and effort, you can take advantage of awards programs to enhance the reputation of your client or organization while boosting morale of their employees. And who doesn’t like to add hardware to the trophy case?

As for Healthcare Heroes, our client’s physician nominee took home the big prize, but all our entries are heroes in their patients’ eyes.

Rx for Reputation Health

Manage Online Reviews

What’s worse than a negative online review of a physician practice?

A negative review that’s left to linger in perpetuity, unanswered, like sagebrush drifting across a ghost town. According to the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), a whopping 99% of healthcare consumers said physician ratings found on the Web were “very important” or “somewhat important” in their decision making.

Digital recommendations can be a boon to your office, but digital slams can be equally impactful in dragging down business. Seventy percent of consumers base purchasing decisions on online recommendations from strangers, and that figure rises to 80% for Millennials, according to a 2015 study by global market research firm Mintel.  Some 86% of consumers will hesitate to purchase goods or services from a business with negative reviews on sites such as Yelp, Healthgrades.com and ZocDoc.com.

Clearly, your online reputation is important, and requires attention and nurturing. During the Public Relations Society of America annual conference in Orlando, which SPRYTE attended, Matt Weber, CEO of ROAR! Internet Marketing, presented “First Aid for Online Reputation,” which offered techniques to help physicians take command of their standing in cyberspace.

First, Do No Harm

Poor or rude service, long waits, arbitrary billing practices or missed diagnoses may foster negative reviews, so start by running a professional, pleasant operation. Why invite negativity? If, despite your best efforts, patients complain online (and there will always be a few), you can manage that feedback and maybe even turn it into a positive endorsement.

Claiming or register your business on the relevant review sites, then keep your ear to the tracks. Just about all of them will alert you when reviews are posted, but you should also sign up for Google Alerts or FreeReviewMonitoring.com for your practice’s name.

There are also paid tools for review monitoring, including:

The Treatment Plan

If a good review shows up, great! No need to do anything, unless you want to write a brief “thank you” note in response.

When a bad review surfaces, however, spring into action pronto:

Respond quickly, preferably within 24 hours. The more prospective patients who read negative comments without seeing your side, the worse it is for your practice. Additionally, no response gives the impression you simply don’t care.

Set up login information and keep it handy. Make sure key support staff have the passwords for all the key review sites, so someone else can respond quickly if the designated employee is unavailable.

Create template responses. Be ready to go with a pre-written but sincere apology and promise to do better, or to address the patient’s issue in more detail, offline and in private. Then follow up. With a few tweaks, you can customize your reply quickly and let the commenter know you’re listening to their specific concern.

If you believe you’ve addressed the problem to the patient’s satisfaction, consider requesting an amended review. A changed opinion could be a great outcome for your practice!

Solicit reviews. You can do this with a third-party site that will manage the process, like SurveyMonkey.com, or by e-mailing patients requesting a review, with direct links to the major review sites.

Review Malpractice

Don’t ever post a fake review, or ask a friend or relative to do so. Google and other sites have algorithms that will weed out fraudulent reviews, and they’ll be removed.

And don’t post reviews from the office, even if they’re legitimate ones compiled from patients. Review-posting on behalf of others is frowned-upon by search engines. Not to mention, patients may not provide their completely honest feedback while they’re still in the office.

Sometimes, despite your best efforts, patients and clients will share their negative encounters with your practice on the Web. But if you are monitoring and KNOW what they are saying about you, you can be in control of reviews, rather than letting them control you.