Growing Thought Leaders

Engaging Internal and External Audiences Key

Like growing a lush garden, developing a reputation for your practice or individual physicians as thought leaders takes cultivation. It’s no easy task. No matter how much your physicians know, no matter how impressive their credentials, you have to disseminate that knowledge consistently in a way that will appeal to their peers and other professionals.

The good news is you don’t have to go it alone. By engaging internal audiences such as colleagues and staff, and nurturing relationships with influencers in your specialty, you can create a web of authority around your physician that goes well beyond what you can accomplish individually.

Using the Intermountain Healthcare’s Cardiovascular Clinical Program as an example, Jason Carlton, the organization’s social media manager, shared advice for developing content and guiding docs to become thought leaders during the Public Relations Society of America Health Academy held in Orlando earlier this year.

Conference as Content

The Cardiovascular Clinical Program sought to enhance its reputation as a top-tier research center in order to attract other cardiologists and practices to potentially partner with. The social media manager does this, in part, by leveraging its physicians’ speaking engagements at professional conferences. These events offer a prime opportunity to engage industry peers, and as a result its content – including blogs, video interviews, and posts from “brand ambassadors” – is oriented toward those audiences.

Importantly, Carlton notes, the process should begin well before the conference itself. His recommendations include:

  • Have doctors and staff prep blogs ahead of time to post during the event.
  • Distribute a news release about your participation and key points of your presentation to local press, being mindful of any embargoes from the conference organizer.
  • Distribute the news release on one or more online distribution sites (e.g. EIN, EurekaAlerts) for search engines to find.
  • Repurpose content of the release for tweets to gin up interest in the weeks and days leading up to the event.
  • Set up Google Alerts for your practice and other key terms relevant to your topic or the conference, and save links as they arrive for more shareable content.

During the Conference

The conference floor is ground zero for content gathering. Carlton recommends the following:

  • Live tweet during the conference, particularly during your doctor’s presentation, to deliver up-to-the-minute information to other professionals. Enlist other physicians in your practice, including your brand ambassadors, to do the same.
  • Collect content from other presenters and exhibitors. This might include presentation decks if available, and links to others’ studies and reports. This can all be great shareable content.
  • Gather intelligence for future posts during speeches. Take pictures and get names of the people in them.
  • Be your own media. Conduct video interviews with your physicians and their peers, either in a studio if available or simply in front of your own booth. Share the clips on your practice’s website and social media, or even Facebook Live, using relevant hashtags and handles. Ideally, clips should be 2-3 minutes long.
  • Identify influencers. Frequently, these will be other presenters or workshop leaders. Tweet what they’re saying, including their handles (researched in advance). Follow them and share their posts. They will likely return the favor.

By delivering a steady stream of quality content, you can gain eyeballs of other professionals and unlock potential working opportunities. But the process takes time and effort. If you involve both internal and external resources, and expand your view of what constitutes great content, you’ll go a long way toward building your practice’s expert creds online.